Are facial wrinkles more pronounced in countries with higher humidity?

That is a really interesting question!

I think what makes more difference is the skin they are in, how they treat it, diet, sunshine and the amount of ozone over their heads. Although the humidity may also play a part.

People with Type 1 Skin (on the Fitzpatrick Skin Scale) do tend to wrinkle earlier than people from the other five categories and there is a marked difference between Types 1 and 6, in terms of wrinkles. Type 1 skin tends to be thinner, prone to inflammation and irritation and sun damage. Whereas Types 4 to 6 tend to have a thicker epidermis, make more scar tissue and sebum but are more robust.

Having said that, there are plenty of people with Type 1 skin living in California, Hong Kong and Saudi Arabia and Type 6 in Chile and Peru (very arid places), so we should be able to compare what those conditions do to all skin types.

The ozone layer is thinnest over the Poles, Australia, Argentina and Chile. And the populations apparently ageing more slowly (in general, not just skin) according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) are Japan, Korea and Italy. Some of those ageing more quickly are the Marshall Islands, the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, New Zealand, Australia, and Fiji.

So, someone with a bigger brain than mine can probably collate all that and decide if there is a correlation between wrinkles and watery air… it’s still a very interesting question!